Patentlyo Bits and Bytes by Anthony McCain

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Anthony McCain

About Anthony McCain

Anthony McCain is a law student at Mizzou where he is focusing on intellectual property; He has a background in mechanical engineering. anthony.mccain@patentlyo.com

12 thoughts on “Patentlyo Bits and Bytes by Anthony McCain

  1. I think the link to Audrey Millemann’s article was likely intended to be targeting this writing:
    http://www.theiplawblog.com

    Currently, above, it is linking to a PC Magazine (nee PCMag?) article on a dubious Sony patent on embedding wireless charging systems in . . . well . . . everything.

    Feel free to eliminate this post when it is no longer relevant (or sooner, as suits).

  2. Hi,

    The link to the “Audrey Millemann: More Patents Invalidated As Abstract Ideas” appears to be incorrect.

    Best regards

  3. My understanding is that China’s government also subsidies the attorneys fees and filing fees for foreign and U.S. patent filings of Chinese corporations (up to USD$10k/patent). How’s that for monopolistic practices.

  4. Re: “Too Simplistic: How the USPTO Measures Outcomes For Ex Parte PTAB Appeals” and its: “..assuming an Examiner rejects all claims under five different grounds, the decision is marked affirmed even if the Board reverses four of the five grounds.”
    ? Is that assuming a legal obligation for the PTAB to formally address all the other four grounds of an examiner’s rejection in every appeal once they have sustained the rejection on one ground? Note 37 CFR 41.50(a)(1).

  5. I think trump’s hiring freeze is supposed to be lifted Wednesday. Let’s hope so for the USPTO’s sake.

  6. The current tunnels under the Hudson River were built in 1908 and are rapidly deteriorating. This problem was exacerbated by Hurricane Sandy, which filled the tunnels with corrosive salt water, and engineers now estimate that without major overhauls the tunnels are likely to fail within the next 10 years. The closing of either tunnel would be devastating because it would essentially shut down the Northeast Corridor, the transit route from Boston to Washington that produces over $3 trillion in economic output — a full 20 percent of the national gross domestic product.

    I’m sure the answer is in one of those Chinese patents!

    1. Here, I fixed it for you by adding the author information you mistakenly omitted!

      “By Charles E. Schumer, Kirsten Gillibrand. Robert Menendez, and Cory A. Booker

      . . . .

      Charles E. Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand are Democ ratic senators from New York. Robert Menendez and Cory A. Booker are Democ ratic senators from New Jersey.”

      No need to thank me 😉 I just wanted to make sure this news piece was not lumped in with all that “fake news” you see these days!!!

  7. China’s various courts accepted an astounding 109,386 civil intellectual property cases in 2015 (6 percent growth over the prior year), including more than 11,000 patent cases. By comparison, the number of patent litigations filed in the United States in 2015 was 5,830 (down from the high-water mark of 6,114 in 2013), where U.S. IP-related litigations as a whole totaled around 14,500 cases (including about 5,000 copyright and about 3,500 trademark actions). In other words, total litigations filed in the U.S. are only about 13 percent of the total filed in China.

    ■ China is increasingly being selected as a key venue for patent litigation between non-Chinese companies. Why? Litigants feel they are treated fairly. Reports indicated that in 2015, 65 foreign plaintiffs won all of their cases against other foreign companies before Beijing’s IP court. And even foreign plaintiffs suing Chinese companies won about 81 percent of their patent cases, roughly the same as domestic Chinese plaintiffs.

    It’s a paradise! More patents and more litigation! Pretty soon everyone will want to move to China.

    ROTFLMAO

    1. The reason for the increase in litigation in China is because they’re a huge market, especially for electronics. The may become or already are Apple’s largest iPhone buyer.

      link to fortune.com

      Everyone wants to get into China because of its massive market, and patent litigation is just a response to this exodus from the US into China.

      1. B-b-but don’t you know, PatentBob, that property rights (in patents) and enforcing those rights are “the worst thing ever”…?

        /”S”

      2. And when they find out that the Chinese courts are great for the Chinese and not for the foreign corporations, they will realize that the courts are just a tool for the Communist Party to disadvantage foreign corporations.

        China is not business friendly unless you are a Chinese business.

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