USPTO removable media policy

If you are visiting the USPTO, do not bring a “personal removable media storage device.”  U.S. Gov’t computer security has been compromised on numerous occasions based via USB drive viruses. The solution is to email the file to the examiner (and yourself); bring in a “finalized CD/DVD“; or connect via a secure file sharing service (PTO suggests Kiteworks).

The prohibition is written broadly — prohibiting anyone from entering the with “devices that can operate as removable media storage devices (e.g. PDAs, digital cameras, and Apple iPods).”  Presumably, this also includes your smart phone — I have contacted the PTO for clarification.

The PTO Notice indicates that most USPTO locations will include scanning-equipment “to check removable media for policy compliance.”  However, that process will cause a delay in admittance (and invade the privacy of your device).

5 thoughts on “USPTO removable media policy

  1. 2

    Phones can be connected in charging mode only. Protection software will block any attempts to connect a storage device to a USPTO-networked computer, including smartphones in file transfer mode. Supposedly, OCIO also gets notified anytime this happens.

  2. 1

    “The prohibition is written broadly — prohibiting anyone from entering the with ‘devices that can operate as removable media storage devices (e.g. PDAs, digital cameras, and Apple iPods).'”

    Where are you getting the “entering” part? I only see a prohibition on “use … with any … computer…”.

    I’m just an out of the loop examiner, but I strongly suspect they just don’t want anyone plugging their personal devices into their network.

    If your interpretation was correct, I suspect POPA would’ve activated their klaxons over examiners being prohibited from bringing their phones onto campus.

    1. 1.1

      Pity the teleworkers, who would be unable to keep a smartphone or removable media in their home? :)

      1. 1.1.1

        Are the teleworkers “visiting” the USPTO at their homes?

        No snark here.

        Home offices SHOULD BE considered the presence of choosing to be in that location for the business so conducted. And this should not be limited to the USPTO.

      2. 1.1.2

        … btw, is the “concern” any less real for teleworkers? (Or is the concern much more severe?)

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