Texas A&M University School of Law

In 2013 Texas A&M purchased the somewhat floundering Texas Wesleyan law school and created what is now the Texas A&M University School of Law – located in Dallas.  In joining with a major research institution, part of the TAMU mission has been to further build the IP program that already includes Megan Carpenter, Brian Holland, and Dennis Kelly.  Today, the law school announced its hiring of four new IP faculty: Professors Peter Yu (from Drake); Glenn Lunney (from Tulane); Irene Calboli (from Marquette); and Saurabh Vishnubhakat (from the PTO).  Congratulations to TAMU on this bold move that will certainly raise its stature in the ever growing Texas market for IP attorneys.  Congratulations both to the law school and its new faculty!

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I have received some criticism for this post.  First – I recognize that the law school is in Ft. Worth, but from my non-Texan distance Ft. Worth is part of the Dallas metro area – as is Plano, Arlington, etc. Admittedly, my knowledge is largely derived from my childhood love of the (original) Dallas TV show. Second, I noted that Texas Wesleyan was “somewhat floundering.”  I do stand behind that, although it should be in the context of the reality that the vast majority of law schools are currently struggling. Finally – Prof Lunney, I do apologize for misspelling your name! -Dennis

 

19 thoughts on “Texas A&M University School of Law

  1. 8

    There really is no need for any more IP/patent attorneys anywhere in Texas. Houston is filled to the brim with former engineers who went through the very excellent night school program at U of Houston, and South Texas school of law does a decent job of over-supplying the Houston market with folks having slightly lower grade credentials.

    BTW, the flagship law school in Texas, U of Texas-Austin, actually takes in more aggies than longhorn undergraduates.

    The aggie law school with IP focus might sound like a good idea but is actually fifteen years too late. Happy job hunting to us all.

    1. 7.1

      As a Texan, I accept your apology, but it’s never too late to learn. ;^)

      If you look at a map of the D/FW Metroplex, you’ll see that Dallas and Fort Worth each have their own metro areas. The Wikipedia entry on “metroplex” (generic, not DFW specifically) may be helpful:
      Wikipedia

      A local adage may help in understanding what makes the difference “important” to some Texans: in Dallas, it’s called “sushi”; in Fort Worth, it’s “bait”.

      Meant as info, not criticism. Cheers!

    1. 6.1

      Correct. Hopefully Dennis Crouch corrects his blog about this. Dallas and Fort Worth could not be further apart. It’s like saying Georgetown law school is not in the District of Columbia but instead is in Baltimore.

        1. 6.1.1.1

          No one outside of FTW knows, or cares about these “worlds apart”.

          Dallasites know no one will refer to them as being from FTW.

          And the rest of the world just doesn’t care.

          Still, anyone having the fortune to visit FTW, stay in the hotel where JFK stayed the night before he died, and dine at the Little Red Wasp across the street. And take the time to walk 7 blocks South and visit the water gardens. Take a decent camera. Good stuff, folks.

  2. 5

    too bad there is little to no demand for IP/Patent attorneys in DFW. Maybe in Austin and Houston, but certainly not Dallas. It’s a strange move to support a policy that promotes moving away from the very community TAMU would hope to endorse. But then again, they are Aggies! ;)

    1. 5.1

      Market studies show a significant demand for IP attorneys of all kinds — both technical and non-technical — in the DFW area and in other metropolitan areas in Texas.

    1. 3.1

      A bit presumptuous Mr. Heller, as those that do more than just patents may properly be called both (and by “properly” I only refer to the assumed state of being registered with the USPTO in addition to belonging to at least one state Bar).

      1. 3.1.1

        anon, for every patent attorney that f**lishly calls himself or herself an IP attorney, there are dozens of non patent attorneys who mooch on the reputation by calling themselves IP attorneys and pretend competence in patent law when instead they are incompetent.

        1. 3.1.1.1

          It could be that the term “IP attorney” is meant to not just signify patent attorneys. Last time I checked, copyrights, trademarks, and trade secrets were still considered to fall under the general umbrella of intellectual property.

        2. 3.1.1.2

          It could be that the term “IP attorney” is meant to not just signify patent attorneys. Last time I checked, copyrights, trademarks, and trade secrets were still considered to fall under the general umbrella of intellectual property.

          1. 3.1.1.2.1

            So a man walks in to a firm called Ajax IP, LLP, specializing in Intellectual Property.

            He asks to see an IP attorney about an invention he wants to patent. None of the firm’s IP attorneys are licensed to practice before the USPTO. The firm takes the case, and hires a patent attorney to write the application. The firm charges the client Big IP Firm rates, which the client cannot pay.

            He notifies the bar that the IP firm robbed him. There is an investigation. The firm, and all its IP attorneys are suspended from practice. Can you tell me why they are suspended?

            1. 3.1.1.2.1.1

              None of the firm’s IP attorneys are licensed to practice before the USPTO.

              Perpetual strawmen from Ned Heller.

              Read again (or for the first time) what I posted at 3.1.

  3. 2

    The joke is on TAMU, there will be no market for patent lawyers after this legislative session.

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